3 Sales Strategies to Steer Your Patient Away from Price

It may seem as though price is one of the largest factors when making sales, but, interestingly, studies show that the typical salesperson is a lot more concerned about price than the typical customer is. Yet new salespeople still seem to love to talk about price!  All that talking about price focuses your patient’s attention on it, even if they weren’t overly concerned with cost at the beginning of the interaction. Hearing aids can be very expensive and it may be hard not to touch on the price, but there are many ways to take your patient’s attention away from price and focus it elsewhere that will help you make the sale.

Smart salespeople handle price as if it were a minor consideration. Of course, when your patient makes it an issue, you need to deal with it effectively. But even then, effective salespeople try to minimize its importance.

Follow these three Hubspot tips during your next sale to minimize the importance of price while still maintaining a healthy margin.

1) Focus on benefits, not features or price.

The best way to convey to your patient that your product is the most appropriate solution to their problem (regardless of price) is to focus all your attention on the benefits. Never assume that a prospect fully understands the benefit of a feature — always point it out and expand on it. The more benefits you apply to the patient’s needs or wants, the more often you’re able to show them what’s in it for them if they choose to partner with you.

2) Build value and then work to deliver it.

When you create value in the eyes of your buyer, the product or service you’re offering becomes more desirable, and price becomes less important. By establishing value early on, you can actually make a higher price work for you as a competitive advantage. Sensible buyers realize that with most purchases, you get what you pay for, and when you do present your price, it can make a statement about the quality of your product.

Use the appointment as an opportunity to pinpoint exactly what the patient considers valuable in a solution, and adjust your offerings to meet that criteria. Price becomes less of an issue when a prospect sees that their problem will be solved.

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3) Present your price confidently — and stick to it.

Success in sales will be driven by two essential factors: margin and volume. In order to maintain your profit margin, it’s necessary to present your price with confidence and stand firm on it. And to deal with price-cutting attempts, you’ll need to get comfortable responding to the phrase “your price is too high.” Try following up with these replies:

  • “Let me tell you why our price is where it is.” At this point, repeat each of the benefits your product provides and the emotional costs your prospect will save by partnering with you.
  • “Let me explain how each of the things we’ve discussed will help you.” Expand on the benefits they’ll receive and the emotional relief you’ll provide them.
  • “We can work to give you a better price. But to do that, we’ll have to remove some of the components we’ve discussed. Which would you like to eliminate?” Your prospect will likely not want to remove or reduce any of the benefits you’ve provided. When you use this as your last option, you’d be surprised at how often a prospect will find a way to make the price work.

By focusing less on price and more on the value you are able to provide your patient, you can keep your buyer’s attention on what they’re ultimately concerned with — finding the right solution. After that, it’s just details.

Are ALL of your employees selling efficiently? Even if they’re not “salespeople,” they should be selling, read more about why here.

How to Answer the Price Question

You know your practice will get this question at least once a week, if not once a day.  Does your staff know how to answer the question?  Do you know what they’re saying?  One of two things is currently happening.  They are either doing a good job of answering the question or they are doing a less than stellar job of answering the question.

Here are few “scripts” your staff can use to answer the question.

“Thank you for contacting our practice.  To answer your question, there are several things that influence the price of a hearing aid. This tends to be true at our practice and probably most other practices you contact.”

The first thing you need to consider is whether you want to pay a one price for the hearing aid and then pay a fitting fee or do you want the fitting fee to be included in the price.

Secondly, almost every hearing aid will need to be reprogrammed several times as your hearing loss changes. If reprogramming is not part of your original purchase price it can cost several hundred dollars each time you need a change to the programming.

Service can also be included in the price and hearing aids will need periodic maintenance and repairs and these fees can add up as well.

Finally, comprehensive programs that include things like free batteries and are also available.

Because there are so many options I would encourage you to make an appointment to meet with our audiologist/hearing aid dispenser in the office. They can talk about what level of options you would be interested in and can provide you with a realistic price that meets your expectations initially as well as over time.”

The exact wording that your staff will use is not as important as the consistency of the message they convey.  More importantly the potential customer asked a question that they expect to have answered.  Telling them that you don’t provide prices over the phone is not what they expect to hear.

The better prepared your staff is to answer the “price question”, the more likely the customer is to make an appointment.  And after all that is the point of the entire exercise.