Giving Gifts to Referral Sources

It’s that time of year. You’ve been busy, extremely busy. As a small business owner you not only handle or at a minimum oversee everything going on in your business you also have a personal life. And this time of year is extra crazy both personally and professionally. You’ve started to panic because you have yet to think about gifts for employees or send out gifts to clients or to referral sources.

Step One, Stop Panicking

You don’t have to wait for the traditional holiday season to give gifts to associates and clients. In fact there’s an argument to be made for choosing an alternate time of the year. Chances are your gift is one of many they’ll be receiving during this time of the year. A thank you that appears in the middle of February all by itself is much more likely to be remembered. Or send a birthday gift instead of a traditional thank you. It’s bound to impress, since it show’s that you’ve bothered to learn a thing or two about the recipient.

Still Want to Send Something in Time For the Holidays?

Opt for food.  It’s easy to give and it’s easy to receive.  If it’s an assortment of food the recipient is bound to like something in the basket.  Take into consideration any dietary and/or religious restrictions (i.e. a kosher office).  Harry and David’s offers kosher baskets.  And cut yourself some slack.  A creative gift while great in theory, unless you know the recipient extremely well will often miss the mark.  Leaving the recipient with really no gift at all.

Remember, Gift Giving is Marketing

Any interaction with a client or referral source should be considered marketing and this should mostly definitely extend to gift giving.

From R. McKenna, Harvard Business Review

There is a paradigm for marketing, a model that depends on the marketer’s knowledge, experience, and ability to integrate the customer and the company. Six principles are at the heart of the new marketing. The first, “Marketing is everything and everything is marketing,” suggests that marketing is like quality. It is not a function but an all-pervasive way of doing business.
Thinking carefully about a gift for your client or referral has the potential to strengthen the relationship you already have so choose wisely.

Everything You Need to Know About Targeted Marketing Campaigns

What are Targeted Marketing Campaigns?

Targeted Marketing Campaigns (TMC) are digital marketing campaigns offered by our sister company, Obelis Media. They are designed to generate leads via the Internet. We use a combination of social media advertising and search engine advertising to generate a significant increase in new traffic to your site. More traffic means more leads.

Target Marketing Campaigns will provide you with immediate results that are quantifiable and can be acted on immediately.

AdWords, Facebook Ads, Google Display Ads, etc. can be complicated. We know how to manipulate the variables including:

• choice of keywords/key phrases
• content of the landing page
• geographical reach
• choice of ad venue (Facebook, Twitter, Google…)
• device type (mobile, desktop…)

We make frequent, sometimes daily, adjustments based on our analysis of your data. Our job is to get the right people to your website to produce the leads you’re looking for while conserving as much of your advertising budget as possible.

What to Expect From TMC

Generate leads

The primary purpose of most advertising campaigns is to generate leads. Efficiency and economy of scale allow our system to generate leads while keeping the cost per lead well below the industry average.

Provide immediate and consistent traffic

As a marketer, it is crucial to be able to drive as many people to your website as consistently as possible. Huge lulls in traffic or huge unexpected spikes in traffic can kill a website. With paid search marketing, traffic amounts can be controlled as they are tied directly to how much the advertiser is willing to pay per click, per day and per month.

Provide an increase in the efficient delivery of your product or service to the intended consumer

The delivery of the campaign can be determined by any number of factors including, but not limited to:

• geography (by town, state or distance from a particular town or zip code, etc.)
• demographics (age, race, religion, gender, etc.)
• interests (hiking, photography, fishing, etc.)
• Increase in the efficiency of campaign development
• The same ad can be tested in using differing criteria to assess the effectiveness of the ad from market to market. Known as split testing we can quickly change the parameters of each campaign to maximize the CPL.

Our campaigns are designed to easily integrate with offline marketing

The ads used in your targeted campaigns can be provided to you in a PDF format. The ad can be used in print media campaigns to allow coordination between your offline and online marketing campaigns. Print ready artwork can be provided for an additional fee.

Allow for a more effective allotment of advertising resources

Your ads will be analyzed daily to assess the effectiveness. The ads, target markets, budget and so on can be instantly reconfigured to provide the optimal cost per lead (CPL).

Produces campaigns that are measurable

Our proprietary dashboard will allow you to see the effectiveness of every ad campaign run by Obelis Media. We make it as easy as possible for you to determine the return on investment (ROI) of each ad campaign by providing you with the data needed to determine your cost per lead (CPL).

What Can TMC Do for You? – Real Results

Instead of just telling you what TMC can do for you, we’d rather show you real-life results. Below we have numbers from an Ohio-based audiology practice. We tracked the practice numbers before and after beginning a Total Marketing Campaign (TMC).

In the month prior to beginning TMC, their results were as follows:

screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-12-15-54-pm

The main results we’re looking at here are calls received and top traffic sources. They received 0 calls within the month and their top referral sources were referring little to no traffic, meaning web visitors were having to find the practice via search engine or organically. They were not putting their practice right in front of their target demographic.

In the month after beginning TMC, their results were as follows:

screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-12-16-25-pm

After running one Facebook marketing campaign for only one month, they saw drastic results. Their website visits went up almost 400%, they received 13 calls from online marketing, and their top referral source was the marketing medium on which we ran the campaigns.

Their results 5 months later are still consistent and growing:

screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-12-19-54-pm

The number of website visits has remained consistent, but the number of calls has almost quadrupled as a result of constant monitoring and campaign tweaks to reach the optimal audience. Facebook (the campaign platform) is consistently the highest traffic referral source.

Targeted Marketing Campaigns puts your practice in front of your target audience and keeps you there. With the lengthy sales cycle of hearing aids, it is important to have contact with potential consumers – early and often. TMC keeps you in your demographic’s minds eye, so that when they are ready to purchase, you’re the business they trust with their purchase.

To learn more,

visit obelismedia.com

3 Ways to Get Around Any Objection in Sales

When was the last time you walked away from a client meeting with no deal? Losing a deal to a competitor is not always a negative situation, but seldom is it the desired outcome.

If you could give one reason why your customer did not choose your service or product, what would it be? In most cases the answer will be rooted in one issue: The failure to overcome your prospect’s objections.

Know this: There are no magic formulas. Nothing can replace an intelligent, well-trained entrepreneur, who can overcome objections in sales or negotiations.

Objections in sales, relationships, business negotiations or other areas are imminent. It’s not a matter of whether an objection will arise but rather a question of when it will occur.

There are no special powers, and this is not rocket science. Simply put, if you want to earn more and close more sales, you need to do the following:

  1. Get in front of more prospects than your competitors.
  2. Know how to close the deal by overcoming objections.
  3. Deliver your message in a clear, straightforward manner.

Also Read: The Best Way to Improve Client Relations and Manage Employees

Of course, there are some other steps between points one and three but for simplicity’s sake, let’s focus on these.

1. Be an active listener.

Listening is one of the most underutilized skills. Active listening means we are mentally noting the objections, agreements and compromises while we continue acknowledging the person speaking.

Be genuine, and invest in learning to listen more efficiently. If we learn and master the skill of active listening, we will experience greater success in sales and in life.

2. Be an effective communicator.

During your next conversation, pay particular attention to see if the other person you are talking with gives you an opportunity to respond to their statement. If you deliver your pitch without giving the other person a chance to respond to you, you are cheating yourself out of an opportunity to answer objections early on in the process.

3. Be flexible.

This applies to you only if you have the freedom to make decisions. If you are restricted from offering price concessions or customizing packages, your freedom to be flexible may be significantly hindered. But, if you do have the ability to make decisions, find a way to do it. In many cases, it is better to bend in a deal than break the whole deal down and lose it altogether.

Also Read: The Top Tactic All Successful Salespeople Use

 

from Entrepreneur.com

SEO vs. PPC: Choosing a Strategy that Fits Your Marketing Goals

Last week we discussed what SEO and PPC were, and a bit about their differences. Even if you understand the basics, it may be hard to determine which is right for your marketing needs. So how do you pick between the two, or must you even choose? AJ Kumar, in an Entrepreuner article, suggests to consider these three questions when deciding whether SEO or PPC are right for your business:

  1. How large is your website advertising budget?
  2. How high are the CPCs in your industry?
  3. How competitive are the SERPs in your niche?

Let’s break these three questions down and explain why they matter.

1. How large is your website advertising budget?

As we discussed last week, SEO is your “free” option when it comes to generating traffic, whereas PPC is the “paid” option. So in choosing between SEO and PPC, you first need to decide what size advertising budget your business can support. With PPC campaigns, we suggest at minimum a $5.00 per day budget.

If you have a very minimal budget to commit to advertising, you’ll need to stick with free SEO methods. But if you have even a little capital to invest in PPC advertising, consider giving it a try because it offers a number of benefits, as AJ Kumar explains, including:

  • “Faster testing. Websites should focus on achieving conversion, whether it’s selling products, signing up email newsletter subscribers or some other action. That means actively testing website variables to improve conversion rates. These tests, however, require traffic to generate data, so you might want to purchase traffic through PPC advertising to get faster results.”
  • “Protection from SEO algorithm updates. One major weakness of SEO is that algorithms change from time to time. When that happens, sites that have been optimized in one way can lose rankings — and profits — practically overnight. But when you pay for traffic, you’re assured a steady stream of visitors, no matter what changes Google and the other search engines make.”

2. How high are the average CPCs in your industry?

While setting your budget, also take a look at what others in your industry are spending on CPC, if possible.

PPC platforms typically allow users to bid what they’re willing to pay for a single keyword click — a fee that’s referred to as “cost-per-click” (CPC). In Google Adwords, for example, broader keywords and keyword phrases, such as “hearing aids,” require a much higher bid than more narrow-focused keywords or keyword phrases, such as “audiologist Bala Cynwyd PA”

If you wish to run PPC campaigns for very broad keywords and phrases you will need a higher budget to have a successful campaign.

3. How competitive are the SERPs in your niche?

Your strategy will also depend on how competitive your search engine results pages (SERPs) are in your industry. For example, if you would like to rank #1 for “hearing aids” you’d be competing with Starkey, Mayo Clinic, NIDCD, and ASHA. But the more specific the niche (specialties and areas) the less competition for top SERP rankings.

In the most competitive industries, you may find that results pages for your target keywords are dominated by authority websites. They can be nearly impossible to displace without a significant investment of time and money. In such cases, it may ultimately make more sense to pay for traffic via PPC promotions.

But it’s almost never necessary to make an “either-or” choice between SEO and PPC. When combined, PPC and SEO are powerful tools. By asking yourself these three questions above, you can begin to determine the optimal mix of PPC and SEO for your website.

SEO vs. PPC: What Are They?

You have two options when it comes to boosting traffic to your site: SEO (or “Search Engine Optimization”) and PPC (or “Pay per Click”). But what do these actually mean? All jokes aside, you really should know what these acronyms mean for your digital marketing campaigns. Let’s dive into each.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Wikipedia defines SEO as “the process of affecting the visibility of a website or a web page in a search engine’s unpaid results—often referred to as ‘natural,’ ‘organic,’ or ‘earned’ results. In general, the earlier (or higher ranked on the search results page), and more frequently a site appears in the search results list, the more visitors it will receive from the search engine’s users.”

In plain English, SEO is the “free” or “organic” way to earn traffic to your website. SEO means employing different strategies to affect search engines’ algorithms in order to get a good ranking in their searches. The lower your ranking (ie. being #1 in search results) gets your website more visibility, which in turn means more visitors coming to your site. In order for SEO to work, you need to be in the top results of a search, because, let’s face it, when’s the last time you looked at the 10th result in Google, let alone the second page? In order to be in the top results for searches related to your business or website, your website must be optimized for SEO.

Pay Per Click (PPC)

Wikipedia defines PPC (also known as cost per click or CPC) as “an internet advertising model used to direct traffic to websites, in which advertisers pay the publisher (typically a website owner or a host of website) when the ad is clicked. It is defined simply as “the amount spent to get an advertisement clicked.”

To break it down, essentially PPC is the “paid” option (notice “PAY” per click) to earn traffic to your website. Ads are set up to be shown on different publishers’ sites and displayed when a relevant keyword is searched or when the page has relevant content to the ad set. These campaigns are what you see as “sponsored ads” on sites like Google or Facebook. You pay each time a visitor clicks the ad to your site. If your ad is never clicked, you are never charged.

There is a big different between these two traffic strategies. Your marketing needs and budget determine which strategy or mix of these strategies is best suited to meet your marketing goals. We will discuss the difference between the two and pros and cons of each in the coming weeks.

How to Write the Most Effective Sales Emails

Two weeks ago we discussed how it’s do or die when it comes to following digital marketing leads. One way of doing this is to begin emailing prospects that come up by digital leads. Emailing a prospect for the first time can be a little scary. Getting off on the right foot and providing value are both critical for success … but these things are easier said than done.

So what should you be writing to pique a prospect’s interest? You’re no doubt careful to avoid phrases that kill an introductory email, but which ones spark a conversation?

As seen at Hubspot, below are 17 phrases to include in your introductory email that create a connection with your prospect.

1. “After researching your business … ”

Alerting the prospect that you’ve spent time researching their business sparks their interest and improves your credibility right off the bat.

2. “Hi [name],”

My colleague recently received an email that started with, “Dear [contact first name].” Needless to say, she didn’t respond. Including the recipient’s name in your email is a great way to grab their attention early, and make it clear that this email is specifically meant for them.

3. “It looks like you’re attempting to do [X]. Is that correct?”

Asking about changes you’ve noticed sparks a meaningful conversation about the prospect’s goals and overarching strategy. For example, did the prospect recently unveil a blog redesign? Has their company posted a new position on the job board? Ask about the shift, and how it figures into the company’s plan.

4. “Why did you decide to download our resource?”

When an inbound lead downloads a piece of content, “Why?” is a natural question. Asking“Why?” allows the prospect to explain the problem they are attempting to solve. Armed with this information, the rep can better help the prospect and provide value.

5. “What’s your top priority right now?”

Identifying the prospect’s top priority provides you the opportunity to dig deeper into that goal. With better knowledge of the prospect’s most pressing priorities, you can showcase the value of your product in a way that resonates with their struggles and aligns with their goals.

6. “How can I help?”

The best sales reps today adhere to ABH — Always Be Helping — instead of ABC. In a crowd of pushy, self-centered salespeople, a rep who strives to serve first is refreshing. Include this phrase in your email to set it apart from the rest.

7. “I really enjoyed … ”

According to Professor Norihiro Sadato, “To the brain, receiving a compliment is as much a social reward as being rewarded money.” Not only does a compliment improve a prospect’s mood, but it is likely to elicit a response when included in a sales email. The more specific, the better.

8. “I read what you wrote/shared/commented on on social media and was wondering … ”

Asking a thoughtful question about a topic the prospect is interested in is an easy way to spark a conversation. If a prospect is writing, posting about, or commenting on a given topic on social media, they’re likely looking to discuss it further.

9. “I’m curious to get your thoughts on … ”

Presenting a prospect with clear next steps keeps the conversation moving forward. With an introductory email, your ask should be small, such as reading a blog post and sharing their thoughts,  or taking a few minutes to answer a question.

10. “Have you ever thought about doing X?”

Instead of giving orders, try piquing the prospect’s interest and asking a question around what they’re hoping to achieve. There is more than one way to solve a problem. And as a sales rep, you can present options the prospect might not be aware of.

Sales reps should always strive to give more than they receive. Providing a quick strategy tip or insight can get the conversation flowing and immediately boosts the rep’s credibility.

11. “I have an idea about … ”

Different phrase, same idea. Who doesn’t love free advice? This is an easy way to engage the prospect in a meaningful conversation about a hot topic.

12. “Congratulations on … ”

Promotions and job changes are some of the most valuable trigger events for salespeople. Congratulating your prospect on accepting a new role or moving to a different company can quickly turn into a sales conversation if you play your cards right.

13. “For more information, check out… ”

Including links to relevant blog posts or research reports at the end of your email makes it easy for the prospect to discover more information on potential solutions to their specific problems, and positions you as someone who wants to help.

14. “[Mutual Connection] mentioned me to that … ”

As it turns out, you’re 4.2 times more likely to get an appointment if you share a personal connection with a prospect. By referencing someone you both know you can improve the likelihood of a response, and ultimately spark a meaningful conversation.

15. “How do you know [mutual connection]?”

Similar to the phrase above, referencing a mutual connection can be very beneficial in starting up an exchange. A shared connection helps you build credibility, and gives you a natural “in.”

16) “Did you know that … ?”

By sharing interesting data with a prospect, the rep can position themselves as a source of valuable information. And if the data sheds light on a problem the prospect is struggling with? You’ve struck gold.

17) “What did you think of … ?”

By asking a potential buyer’s thoughts about a recent industry event or news, you’re not only starting a conversation with the prospect, but you’re also gathering vital information in regards to where they stand on certain issues.

While every prospect is going to respond differently to your email, certain phrases increase the chances that your message will hit home and elicit a response. Instead of worrying about messing the email up, try focusing on making it great. These phrases can help.

Why is Emotional Marketing So Important?

In the book “Twenty Ads That Shook the World,” James Twitchell writes about N.W. Ayer & Son, an advertising agency with a serious problem. One of their clients wanted to sell colorless rocks. These rocks were good for almost nothing except drill bits. What was even worse, the darn things last forever and are found in tremendous oversupply in South Africa, Zaire, Ghana, Namibia, Botswana, Australia, Siberia and Canada.

For N.W. Ayer & Son, it was a puzzle. Their client, DeBeers Consolidated Mines, had made some inroads with consumers after World War I by linking diamonds with engagement and marriage, but the idea wasn’t widely accepted. In April 1947, Frances Gerety, one of their copywriters, put her head down in exhaustion. How could she link romance, valueless crystals and human needs in a way that would move these stones? In an inspired moment she wrote “A Diamond is Forever.”

Look where diamonds are now.

Other Emotional Marketing Examples

Brands like GoPro, Coca-Cola, and Apple deliver campaigns that represent their company mission and vision. GoPro wants its audience to feel that they’re getting a product that will enhance their adventures and allow them to capture even the craziest of tricks, jumps, hikes, etc. Apple wants its audience to feel like they’re getting something that is not only innovative, shiny and new, but also useful—a tool that will make day-to-day tasks easier to accomplish.

They also want their audience to feel like they’re part of a lifestyle or community of thinkers and doers. They do this with commercials that represent people of all backgrounds. Pay attention to the look and feel as well: Crisp video and sound, soft glows, bright colors and happy faces; people doing everyday tasks in innovative ways.

Now, think of Coca-Cola. Remember those polar bear ads? You’ll notice a common theme many of us strive for and can relate to: bliss, enjoyment, happiness. The polar bears crack open a Coke bottle and look so overwhelmingly satisfied and happy that it makes us want one too. Those emotions are all deeply integrated in Coca-Cola ad campaigns because they’re also ingrained in Coca-Cola’s mission. Part of the reason why is because happiness represents one of many current cultural values.

Emotional Marketing, Explained

Emotion plays a critical role in guiding our instinctive reaction to events happening around us. We monitor our environment constantly and automatically, but with so many things going on around us, we need some means to determine what to pay attention to. From a psychological perspective, when we feel something, we think, “What can I make of this, what can I do about this?” The deep response often happens first and we then rationalize it and make sense of it cognitively. This can’t be a conscious process – it would take too long. So the monitoring process constantly references existing memories as those memories are spontaneously triggered by what is happening at the time.

It is the emotional properties of those memories that determine whether we pay attention or not, and how much attention we pay. The more intense the emotional charge of the associated memories, the more attention we pay and can lead us to a certain behavior—like word-of-mouth sharing or social media liking.

If the association is positive it is likely we will feel attracted to what is happening. If it is negative, we will feel repelled. This is an important reason why advertising that creates a positive emotional response performs better than an ad that doesn’t.

It is critical for marketers to understand the role of emotions in human decision-making and behavior. All human behavior is driven by emotional input derived from these stored visualizations. As a marketer, if you can tap into a strong, positive emotional response from your consumers – you’ve tapped a gold mine.

It’s Do or Die When It Comes to Following Digital Leads

For your small business, following up leads is everything, especially internet marketing leads. Digital marketing is a big shift for small business, but it’s a leap you need to make in order for your business to survive. Grant Cardone from Entrepreneur.com explains further below.

Digital-media advertising is now bigger than national-TV advertising and is expected to exceed total TV advertising spending by 2018. This shift to digital is driving an unprecedented number of customers to websites and landing pages. This is also creating new problems and bigger opportunities for entrepreneurs that can figure out how to effectively respond to these prospects.

How big is the opportunity? Well, have you ever reached out to a business’s website, filled out a form showing interest only to be completely ignored? Of course you have. In fact, 65 percent of all companies admit that they have no process to nurture leads.

Not sure about where to start with digital marketing? We’re here to help.

This is a huge follow-up problem. Did you know 44 percent of all sales people give up after one follow-up call? Who allows this to happen? Companies that nurture leads have 47 percent higher profit margins than companies that do not. This means prospects put the value on quick response, not on lowest price.

Smaller businesses and solo entrepreneurs often point the finger to limited infrastructure to handle follow up, but the reality is if you are a small-business owner, this is where you need to invest in order to survive.

Why do salespeople and companies fail to follow up? Many common reasons they don’t follow up are: because there are too many leads, leads are cold by the time they get to them, and there’s no organized process for follow up.

The reality is there is no commitment to follow up. The culture of your company has made it OK not to follow up. Now, in defense of the sales team, if your salespeople don’t know how to effectively follow up, what to say, how to text, when to email, when to call, when to offer more information or simple things like how to get the lead on the phone, then how can you even make a second call, much less the five to 12 calls necessary to convert the Internet lead to a purchase?

This problem is your opportunity and I know how to make it your new best friend. Follow these three steps:

  1. Share the facts about lead response and follow up with your team:

Average response time for an Internet lead is 44 hours.

65 percent of all companies don’t nurture the lead.

Only 25 percent of all salespeople make two contact attempts.

It requires eight follow up attempts just to qualify the lead.

80 percent of all transactions require five to 12 follow-ups.

If you include texting in your response, you increase your conversion rate by 40 percent. When effectively used, texting can improve conversion by over 100 percent.

  1. Make a commitment to follow up at your company. This is about your culture and can only be the decision of executive management.
  1. Give your staff a very precise schedule and actions for each follow up attempt using a variety of means. A schedule might look like this:

Automated response within five minutes. “Thank you. Someone will be right with you.”

Text message or email (text preferred) response with information overload and terms guarantee.

A same-day call from quality service.

Same-day email message. “Please call me immediately regarding your interest. I have a way for you to take advantage of great savings.”

The management call. “What can we do to earn your business?”

If you still fail to convert the lead, you must create an exact follow-up process from day two through the next 12 months. Don’t just write it off.

Stop struggling. Take advantage of this opportunity to differentiate yourself in today’s market. Create a solid follow-up system and make it part of your culture. Follow up or die out.

How to Set Better Content Goals and Achieve Them

When I’m writing blogs every week, I learn new things all the time. While looking for an idea to write about this week, I stumbled upon a great article by Copyblogger about wide versus deep content. I’ve read a lot about creating content, but this article made me think about content in a whole new way. When you’re writing content, there should be many goals attached to it. Usually, you want to inform the reader about the topic you’re writing on, but what else are you trying to achieve? Gain your readers’ trust? Attract new readers? There are many things you can achieve when you create content. So how can wide or deep content help, and when should you use them? The following is a bit of Copyblogger’s article discussing these questions.

“Creating effective content is hard. I don’t want to deter you from crafting content for your business, but you need to set goals for everything you create.
Whether you produce content that is timely or evergreen, audio or text, knowing your goals will ensure you maximize the return on your time and resources invested in content marketing.
Each piece of content needs to be placed into one of two categories: wide or deep.
And each category has one specific goal:
• Wide content attracts new audience members.
• Deep content strengthens relationships with your existing audience members.
An effective content marketing strategy uses both wide and deep content, but an individual piece of content shouldn’t try to meet both goals.
Let’s explore each type of content goal.

Going Wide with your Content

When you create a piece of wide content, you attempt to reach the most readers, listeners, and customers as possible. In short, going wide is how to use content to find customers.
Wide content is not about immediate results. Instead, it positions your net to continually find new people who fill the top of your funnel.
You will notice a pattern with wide content: it’s perfect for repurposing. With a little planning and forethought, you will be able to repurpose wide content into different formats to reach a broader audience.

SEO Helps you Go Wide

The foundation of all wide content is built upon SEO, and Google is a top source of new traffic and visitors to websites.
Because of this, we need to consistently create useful and relevant content for our website visitors. It’s an excellent first step for all wide content pieces.
Our net spreads even further when people link to and share remarkable wide content.

Wide Content and Podcasting

With the recent rise in popularity of podcasting, content creators should utilize the reach of audio. Think of iTunes the same way you think of Google: it’s a massive search engine that helps your audience find you.
Starting a podcast does not have to be a daunting task. You just need the right platform.
In fact, podcasting is an excellent way to repurpose popular content from your website. If an article has been popular as a written piece, with minor alterations to the text, you may be sitting on a great podcast episode or two.
Cast your proven content far and wide, and craft audio content as you would any other content you publish on your website:
• Write engaging headlines for titles.
• Provide keyword-rich show notes.
• Keep a consistent publishing schedule.

Going Deep with your Content

When creating wide content, your goal is to reach as many potential readers, listeners, and customers as possible — but you shouldn’t try to reach everyone.
Always keep your focus on your perfect customer.
Going deep with your content nourishes and strengthens your relationships with those people you attracted with your wide content.
Deep content moves people from cold audience members to warm audience members, and then to customers. It’s like the second date and beyond with your audience.

How to Use Email to Go Deep

For years, people have been touting the death of email. Yet, to this day, email is the most powerful tool we have in our arsenal as content marketers.
There is no better way to deepen our relationships with our audience members than through access to their inboxes.
Email content, when done right, is powerful value exchange. You’re able to provide multiple points of value to your audience in exchange for their attention.
You could:
• Write a newsletter.
• Curate content your audience will love.
• Craft a useful email autoresponder series.
All deep content marketing strategies need to include email marketing.

Is your email marketing lacking? Here’s the easiest way to optimize your email marketing campaigns.

Can Social Media be Deep?

Social media is often viewed as a wide content vehicle, but when you think about it this way, you overlook its deepest value.
For example, think about why you follow someone on Twitter. Are you there to see an endless stream of promotion, or are you looking for a behind-the-scenes view?
Of course, social media can and should be used to promote your content, but without interesting personal insights mixed into it, your social media presence will flounder rather than flourish.

Clarify your Content Goals by Going Wide or Deep

As with everything in your business, crafting content without specific goals will diminish both the short-term and long-term benefits of the work you are putting in today.
As a bonus, there is often an overlap between content created to go wide and content created to go deep.
For example, your goal may be to go deep, but the same content may also help you find new audience members. Remember that this is a side benefit and shouldn’t be confused with your original goal.
Always focus on one type of goal for each piece of content you create.
Your goal is to either find new audience members or form deeper connections with existing audience members.”

Are You Setting Your Business Apart?: Tips to Effectively Sell

What do you offer to your clients that make you stand out from your competitors? Now, are potential customers aware of this? If they’re not then you’re not effectively selling your product or services. If you don’t even know what makes you better than your competitors, then, let’s be honest, you need to figure it out.

What Sets You Apart?

Entrepreneur magazine sums it up best. “ A USP stands for “unique selling proposition.” It’s the thing that makes you unique in the marketplace—it’s what customers can get from you that they can’t find anyplace else. Having a clear USP gives you a clear response for these questions:

  • How are you unique?
  • In what way are you different from your competitors?
  • Why should I buy from you, rather than from someone else?
  • Why should I care at all about you or anything you sell?”

Maybe you don’t know what can make you unique from your competitors? Here are some things that can give you a niche that you may have overlooked:

  • The buyer you serve
    • Do you sell to a specific age group? Gender? Religion? Do they have a specific problem that you can fix?
  • What you sell
    • Is your product unique in some way? Are YOU the thing for sale and your personality is what sets you apart?
  • You have an unusual angle
    • Are you available when no one else is, such as on holidays or around the clock? Do you promise a specific outcome or unusual level of service? Maybe a unique payment plan?
  • What your product or servicedoes not do
    • A perfect example of this is when food products advertise that they contain no GMOs. Is there something your product does not contain or do? Is there something you will never do while providing a service, like never being late?
  • The time frame around your offer
    • Do you promise results within a set amount of time or for a set amount of time?
  • How you guarantee your product
    • Do they get results or their money back? Do you offer an extended warranty?

And How Do You Sell It?

Chris Brogan, consultant, CEO, and master seller gives great advice. “You’d be surprised what goes into really good selling. It’s not all that complex, though there are mountains of things you have to learn to make this work better and better. I’ll tell you what I’ve learned are the elements of good selling:

  • Know who you serve and what they want. If you don’t know your buyers, you don’t really have a product or service, do you?
  • Know what you sell and who will most benefit from it. And by this, I mean with clarity. Know what exactly the rewards of owning what you sell will be. Know how to explain this to people.
  • Master the buying cycle. Selling a house is way different from selling software. Selling deals is trickier than selling insurance. Some take more time. Some take less. Learn it yourself, and/or ask others who sell what you sell for their tips on a buying cycle.
  • Master their language. People won’t buy if they think what you sell isn’t for them. It took us months (maybe years) to nail down how to talk about what we offer. “Simple plans for business success” is what we say, but those five words have a LOT of meat tucked into them. But what matters most about them is that the people we serve (you) helped us define what that means.”